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A Hawaii WWII Emergency Thema Silber-Zertifikat 1 Dollar Brown Siegel, LC in extrem feine EF Zustand, was ein großes Geschenk oder Ergänzung für jede. DOLLAR, DOLLARNOTE, 1 US-Dollar, Kopie, Replik, Silberzertifikat, neu - EUR 1, Dollar, Dollarnote, 1 US-Dollar, Kopie, Ansichtsexemplar, Replik.

Dollar, Dollarnote, 1 US-Dollar, Kopie, Replik, Silberzertifikat, neu

Entdecken Sie die große Vielfalt an Angeboten für Dollar in Papiergeld aus der Usa. Riesen-Auswahl führender Marken zu günstigen Preisen online bei eBay kaufen!

Frankenberg , Versand nach: Gefällt mir uns auf Facebook. Siehe Details auf eBay Beobachten Kontakt. EUR 1,00 0 Gebote 6d 17h. EUR 1,00 0 Gebote 6d 14h. EUR 1,39 Sofort-Kaufen 11d 14h. EUR 1,00 0 Gebote 5d 14h. EUR 1,25 Sofort-Kaufen 13d 18h. EUR 1,59 Sofort-Kaufen 13d 18h. EUR 1,00 0 Gebote 6d 15h.

EUR 1,00 1 Gebot 5d 14h. EUR 1,99 Sofort-Kaufen 18d 15h. EUR 1,99 Sofort-Kaufen 13d 19h. EUR 1,99 Sofort-Kaufen 22d 16h. EUR 1,99 Sofort-Kaufen 21d 20h. EUR 1,99 Sofort-Kaufen 22d 15h. EUR 1,99 Sofort-Kaufen 20d 18h. EUR 2,69 Sofort-Kaufen 11d 11h. EUR 3,25 Sofort-Kaufen 16h 15m. In November Oklahoma was inaugurated as the 46th state, while in Seattle, Washington, the worlds famous Pikes Market was dedicated. Then on December 31, the famous Ball dropped in Times Square for the very first time.

The design of this note, commonly known as the "Woodchopper," is a favorite among collectors. This note shows the transition from an older style to a newer design concept that was adopted in the 's.

Federal Reserve Notes were first issued in , and are the only type of paper money that the United States prints today. All other banknotes issued by the US still remain legal tender, but only the Federal Reserve notes are still in production.

This five dollar note was initially printed with red serial numbers and a red Treasury Seal but soon were changed to blue. The Treasury Seal and Serial Numbers changed to green in Note that the Federal Reserve Seal has both the number and it's designate letter in the center of the seal. This letter was dropped for the small size and A series FRN's and only the number was printed.

Beginning with the B series the letter replaced the number. There are two vignettes on the back of this note. The left one is by Charles Schussele and is called "Columbus' Discovery of Land", the same as the one found on the front of the large size 1 dollar United States Legal Tender banknote towards the top of this page. The vignette on the right side on the back of this note depicts the "Landing of the Pilgrims". The size of all banknotes became smaller beginning in Here's a Federal Reserve 5 Dollar note.

You'll of course notice that the Treasury Seal on the right is green like our modern notes, and the Federal Reserve seal has a number instead of a letter.

Commonly called "Numbered Districts" or "Numerical Notes", the district numbers were printed on the and A series of notes only. With B series they went to the lettered designation, so this number, 11, would later become K which is, as written on the bottom of the seal, the Dallas, Texas branch of the Federal Reserve Bank.

Today only the One and Two Dollar notes follow the lettered Federal Reserve Seal format, as there is an eagle in the middle of the seal on all other denominations. In addition, a safeguard to stop the banks from going broke was instituted; they had to deposit one-third of their assets in bonds with the US Treasury.

Once done, the banks then could issue National Currency with their banks name on it as well as the city and state that branch was in. When the US decided to create smaller currency, the National Banknotes adopted the brown seal and serial number scheme and followed a standard design to fall into a more cohesive look for US Currency. Notice that the Bank and Location are stamped on the left side of the portrait. There are four signatures on this note. The top two are the Register of the Treasury and the Secretary of the Treasury.

The bottom two are the local Bank Officers signatures. These banknotes were backed by bonds the banks deposited, which is noted under the National Currency at the top of the banknote. The bold numbers on the left and right are the National Banks Charter Numbers. National Banknotes were discontinued in when they were slowly removed from circulation. This is a Type I note, having the charter number printed only in black on the note, which was issued from through Type II also had the charter number printed in brown like the serial number was, and were issued throguh National Banknotes were ended in when teh governmnet called in all the bonds which secured the funds which backed these notes.

A quick comparison to the previous note will show that the Treasury Seal on the right is Brown to differentiate from the FRN's, and the Federal Reserve seal is missing altogether, replaced by four bold letters for the district and text stating they are from the Federal Reserve Bank and in this case of Cleveland, Ohio. The reason for these notes was that in the first months of , there was a heavy withdrawal from the Federal Reserve in part due to people holding onto their money personally because many banks were failing.

National Banks could not issue more currency, due to limitations based on their holdings to issued notes ratio. This resulted in a shortage of available Federal Reserve banknotes for the public.

These emergency notes were printed on unused National Banknotes, like the one preceding this note. There are some obvious differences including the overstamp of the bank and location, which was replaced by the Federal Reserve Bank for the district. Instead of leaving the two bottom signatures blank, they Federal Reserve Bank officers signed there note the two blacked out National Bank titles replaced with appropriate Federal Reserve Bank titles.

After two years in service, these notes were removed from circulation by the banks. Next up is this Blue Seal Silver Certificate. Though the USA left the gold standard, Silver certificates were widely used, and were legal tender for all debts public and private. This note, with four leading zeros in the serial number would be considered to have a low serial number.

Lower serial numbers, or repeating numbers, and other special types are often more desirable to collectors. This note would just be on the edge of being desirable due to the low number.

During WWII it was thought that the Japanese might try to invade the Hawaiian Islands, and as a precautionary measure, the government issued notes specifically for this island chain. As a further precautionary measure, the Treasury seal and serial numbers of the notes were colored brown. These notes were brought home and are still legal tender today, as all government notes are. The yellow seal and serial numbers were used as a precautionary measure to ensure that if the Axis were to obtain a large amount of these notes in battle, the U.

All the notes issued in North Africa were Silver Certificates. Today we only have Federal Reserve notes like the one below from , with a green seal and serial numbers which was issued along with the notes above: Note which had red seals and serials and the Silver Certificate with blue seals and serial numbers. In there were some design changes made including the size of the black FRN letter designator seal at left, and the green treasury seal at right with the size of the FIVE over it also reduced.

The date on the top left was removed, leaving the one at the bottom right. The text size of the redemption clause was also reduced. This Silver Certificate had some design changes from the , including a gray 5, smaller seal, change in the placement of the date, etc.

Like the above Silver Cert, the following B United States aka Legal Tender Note had some design changes from the issue, including a gray 5, smaller seal, change in the placement of the date, etc. This note is also a replacement note, designated by the star in the serial number. Issued at the same time as the above, this Federal reserve note has the familiar green seal and serial numbers.

This Federal reserve note has the familiar green seal and serial numbers but is sporitng a new design on the green Treasury Seal. They changed over from the old Latin to English in this year. The older Latin phrase was "Thesaur.

As time went on, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing decided that the banknotes of the United States needed to be updated with more elements to deter counterfeiting. In they introduced the new large portrait designs of the 20, 50 and dollar banknotes, and in the 10 and 5 dollar banknotes were introduced. Here's the 'Big-Head' five introduced in This design change was primarily done to combat counterfeiting and incorporated a watermark, new security thread and microprint.

Like the big-heads, the colorized banknotes were primarily made to deter counterfeiters. These rings are disguised as zeroes in the grouping of several yellow 05's on the front left and right reverse. The pattern was developed in for the Euro banknotes and the word is a combination of Euro and Orion. This note is of the Large Size variety which was issued prior to Back then, banks which wanted to issue their own banknotes could do so by becoming a National Bank. To do so required the bank to put up bonds with the U.

Treasury, and have a minimum amount of capital in their bank. The banks were also allowed to issue funds up to the full amount of their funds on deposit with the U.

This note has some distinctive features including a portrait of William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States, placed at the far left in a porthole type frame. The blue seal and serial numbers, later designated solely for Silver Certificates, was then in vogue for other notes as well.

The larger numbers with the letter are known as a Charter Number assigned by the government to the National Bank. The oddest thing to strike most people is the two dates: The notes with these dates are commonly referred to as "Date Backs', and are a representation of the inclusive dates of the intended issuance granted for these notes by the Treasury.

After , these notes were originally supposed to end their service. But there are notes without these dates called Plain Backs , which were issued after due to the need for the notes in the economy at the time. This was before the Federal Reserve adopted the green seals we are used to seeing today. When this note was issued World War One known then as the Great War began and lasted four devastating years. Meanwhile, Pancho Villa was riding the wave of revolution in Mexico.

This banknote was worth Two-days of minimum wage labor. It would cost five - cents to see the new movie 'Making a Living' in which Charlie Chaplin made his debut in silent film. The reverse of this note is interesting as it's vignette depicts allegorical representations of Agriculture and Industry in what was then common form. Note the four horses and three men instead of one tractor and one man in the wheat field, and the many smokestacks in the factory darkening the sky.

These images bring to mind how much the United States, and the world, has changed since then. Most us us have known that there were Silver Certificates, but we also had Gold certificates as well. These notes were backed by gold just as the silver certificates were. Authorized back in , they weren't issued to the general public at first, and were used only in fiscal transactions between banks and other fiscal organizations.

In they were released for general public use and were used just like any other banknote. The last large size issue was series These issues were very distinctive, as they were not only large, but the reverse images were all printed in a bright orange color, which is carried onto the front with the seals and serial numbers. Gold certificates were subject to the Gold Reserve Act of which required all U.

While the large sized notes were by then gone from circulation, they were not allowed to be owned by the public.

In they were let back into the public hands, albeit without the gold backing. Combined with their being fewer in number, their long absence helped to make them less well known to most of the general public. This is a Large Sized 10 dollar Gold Certificate. The portrait is of Michael Hillegas, the first U. Actually, he held the offices of the Treasurer of the United Colonies , later changed to the Treasurer of the United States The Redemption Clause reads: Acts of March 14, , as amended and December 24, When the currency was redesigned and resized in , the gold certificates suffered the loss of their bright reverse image, but retained the color for the serial number and the seal.

The references to these Gold Certificates is made only on the front. The reverses of these notes are identical in design to the Federal Reserve Notes. The series small sized gold certificate shown above was rather short lived, as it was subject to the Gold Reserve Act of which stated that all United States citizens were required to turn in their gold as well as their gold certificates to the treasury, which exchanged the gold and the certificates for other types of currency.

Exceptions were made for some jewelry and collector coins. Wisely, not everyone did so, and we have a large number of these notes to collect, though they are rather expensive, especially in uncirculated conditions. The gold certificates were released back to the public again in and are still considered legal tender, but their redemption clause was rendered invalid just like the silver certificates.

It sounds strange now, but it was a criminal offense for US citizens to have or trade gold until Here's a Federal Reserve 10 Dollar note. The Treasury Seal on the right is green like our modern notes, and the Federal Reserve seal has a number instead of a letter. With B series they went to the lettered designation, so this number, 4, would later become D which is, as written on the bottom of the seal, the Cleveland, Ohio branch of the Federal Reserve Bank.

First glance at this and it's likely you'd miss the change in design. This note, a B issue, has a new style of the Federal Reserve Seal, changing from the numbered designator, to the lettered designator. This one was issued for the Chicago branch, and is letter 'G', which is the 7th letter in the alphabet, and thus has the four small black number 7's on the face.

These emergency notes were printed on unused National Banknotes. There are some obvious differences though, including the overstamp of the bank and location, which was replaced by the Federal Reserve Bank for the district. National Currency also underwent a design change as well as a resizing after National Banknotes were ended in when the governmnet called in all the bonds which secured the funds which backed these notes.

This is a 'Type 1' note, identifiable by the National Bank Charter Number being printed on the front of the note twice, on the left and right sides, in bold numbers.

See 'Type 2' below. This is a 'Type 2' note, identifiable by the National Bank Charter Number being printed two times in bold on teh left and right sides, as well as being printed two additional times in brown ink adjacent to the serial numbers.

See 'Type 1' above. As with all the other notes, the 10 dollar Silver Certificates were resized to their present dimensions. The note shown here is a C Series note.

I can remember getting these in change and in cards as presents when I was a kid in the 's and 's, but even though I tried taking them to the coin shops to see how valuable they were, the coin shops no interest in them, so I spent them usually on candy and such. This one I had to buy; sure wish I kept them instead. It has the modern redemption clause we use today. While this looks much more familiar to us, you will notice that the seal and serial numbers are pale, lime green color.

The greens actually come in Dark Green, Lime or light Green and normal green. Depending on how the inks were mixed and how many were printed with that color, some notes can command a premium for collectors.

In Hawaii, it was thought that the Japanese might try to invade the Hawaiian Islands, and as a precautionary measure, the government issued notes specifically for this island chain. This note is a A Federal Reserve Note. You can easily see the difference between this regular issue and those special issued for Hawaii and North Africa. This note is a A series. The redemption clause is the same, but the sentences were made slightly longer to reduce it from four lines to three, and teh date at the top left of the portrait was removed.

The number placement of the four black numerical Federal Reserve Bank indicators have also moved in slightly. The back of the note, however is still the same. This note is a Silver Certificate. The main changes from the SC issue were in the numeral color at left and the smaller size of the treasury seal on the right.

In changes in were more modest in appearance, but very important. Let's start with the redemption clause. As if adding a prayer to this new clause's acceptance, the motto "In God We Trust" was added to the back, above the U. In there was a sleight design change, which is represented in this FRN. At first glance, it has little change from the previous issue, but if you look close, you will see that the Treasury Seal had a change from Latin to English and reads "The Department of the Treasury - ".

Above is an example of the larger portrait 10 dollar note issued in , and is a "Big Head" design. The new design was done to combat counterfeiting and incorporated a watermark, new security thread and microprint, and color changing ink. This particular note is also called a 'Star Note' due to the star at the ends of the serial numbers. The star is a designation that the individual note was issued as a replacement for a note that was not issued due to printing errors or other notes that were destroyed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing because they were damaged, too worn, etc.

Here's the colorized 10 dollar banknote that followed the big head issue above. The EURion pattern is disguised in the pattern of yellow 10's that are on the front left and again on the right reverse. In the notes were bigger than today, and there was a lot of modernization going on everywhere, especially in the field of transportation.

The reverse of this 20 Dollar Federal Reserve Note below depicts what were then very modern conveyances: Trains and ships were of course the best way to cover long distances then, as the automobile was just a burgeoning market in the United States.

The plane was still a long way from being able to carry passengers beyond the pilot and perhaps one other person. The road depicted on the note next to the train appears to be much better than the average road in those days, which were often in deplorable condition: The portrait would also change from Grover Cleveland to Andrew Jackson.

This note looks as if it's from another time. Here is a spectacular looking note with a bright Orange reverse. Orange serial numbers and seals on the front also ensured that this note was as good as gold. George Washington sits at center with a beautiful ornate border. It seems like shouldn't be so long ago, but the world has changed considerably since then. In Then President Warren G. Harding brought the first radio into the White House, women in the USA finally got the right to vote with the passage of the 19th amendment to the Constitution, and Rebecca Felton of Georgia was elected first female US Senator.

The Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in Washington D. And in Egypt, Howard Carter discovered Tutankhamen's tomb, filled with lot's of gold. Up next is a Federal Reserve 20 Dollar note. The Treasury Seal on the right is green like our modern notes, and the Federal Reserve seal has a number instead of a letter designation. These numbers were printed on the and A series of notes only.

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There are some obvious differences including the overstamp of the bank and location, which was replaced by the Federal Reserve Bank for the district. When this note was issued World War One known then as the Great War began and lasted four devastating years.

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Here's a Federal Reserve 10 Dollar note.

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